Drone light show scrapped after logistical challenges at Olympics opening ceremony

Drone light show scrapped after logistical challenges at Olympics opening ceremony

Drone light show scrapped after logistical challenges at Olympics opening ceremony

The spectacular sight of 1,218 drones forming the Olympic rings during the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics was pre-recorded.

US viewers tuned in to a tape-delayed broadcast on Friday night that showed rehearsal footage from December, when Intel's light show broke the Guinness World Record for flying the most drones, 1,280, simultaneously.

"As it turns out, bring 1,218 of those drones into harmony doesn't present much more of a logistical challenge than 300, thanks to how the Shooting Star platform works". "From flying 100 drones simultaneously in 2015, to 500 drones in 2016, and now more than 1,000 drones - the sky is the limit with entertaining through Intel drone light shows".

"And while more drones does provide a broader canvas, it perhaps more importantly affords a better sense of depth". The Unmanned Aerial Vehicles themselves are fitted with LED lights to produce a virtually unlimited number of color combinations, with each 384mm x 384mm (15.1 inch x 15.1 inch) quadcopter weighing in at 330g (0.73lbs).

An army of high-flying drones expected to light up the sky at the opening ceremony of the Olympics was grounded.

Mauricio Pochettino says Tottenham feel at home at Wembley
That would give Arsenal a mountain to climb. "The Arsenal game was not the goal, it was just to be back as quickly as possible". Despite the 2-0 loss away at the Emirates in November, Spurs head into the North London derby this weekend as the favourites.

It was a site that showed just how gorgeous technology can be. Pyeongchang was chosen in 2011 for the event, making this the first time for South Korea to host the Winter Olympics.

The XXIII Olympic Winter Games is being held in Pyeongchang, South Korea from February 9 to 25.

"The Olympics is all about pushing boundaries", Anil Nanduri, general manager of Intel's Drone Group told CNN Tech. One human employee, dubbed the pilot, hits a button on a computer to launch the automated show.

But during Friday's evening broadcast, Intel will also organize the drones to resemble a snowboarder racing down a slope. "Not unlike the athletes competing in the events, we continue to push to innovate and develop the drone technologies that inspire people all over the world".

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